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Is The Coronavirus Crisis Further Dividing the EU?

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The coronavirus crisis really brings into question what the EU is all about.

Most Eurosceptics often have claimed that united states of Europe are not feasible and far from attainable right now

Right now, every European government is struggling to protect their populations – their jobs, their health and their economy.

The European Commission has proposed a programme to protect jobs and workers affected by Covid-19 to the tune of €100bn (£85bn; $107bn).

It also announced a €50m aid scheme for Italy to provide medical equipment. The European Central Bank has promised a €750bn stimulus package to help keep the Eurozone afloat.

But what of individual EU governments – will they club together to help? Rich, Europhile countries like Germany are not yet digging deeper in to their pockets to help out poorer Italy and Spain. There’s little sense of the responsibility West Germany felt towards the East after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Why would there be, you might ask. Germany is a sovereign nation, facing its own pretty big problems.

But therein lies the question: What does European Union really mean?

Germany has sent medical masks to Italy. It has taken coronavirus patients from France and Italy into its hospitals for treatment.

But it has also rejected a plea by Italy, Spain, France and others to share out coronavirus-incurred debt in the form of coronabonds (or Eurobonds).

Many Italians feel abandoned, just as they did at the time of the euro and migrant crises.

This week, a group of Italian mayors and other politicians bought a page in Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper to remind Germany that it was never made to pay back its debts after WW2.

They criticized the public lack of support in the wealthy Netherlands too.

An 81-year-old Italian called BBC to say: “Katya, you understand about Europe, don’t you? Why don’t they want to help us?”

And Arch-Eurosceptic Former Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini hopes to make political capital out of his country’s crisis.

On Thursday, he tweeted: “We have to re-examine Europe (the EU) and Italy’s role in it. It has not come to our aid at all.”

This is not actually the case.

France preaches solidarity. On Thursday, French Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire declared that all of the EU looked to Germany for a solution.

 

Well, I’ve spoken to Germans, inside politics and out. To them, that sounds a lot like France telling Germany to pick up the Covid-19 tab for Europe.

Instead, Berlin favor’s dipping into the European Stability Mechanism – a bailout fund created after the 2008 financial crisis.

But Austria and the Netherlands insist there should be tough conditions attached.

And Arch-Eurosceptic Former Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini hopes to make political capital out of his country’s crisis.

On Thursday, he tweeted: “We have to re-examine Europe (the EU) and Italy’s role in it. It has not come to our aid at all.”

This is not actually the case.(BBC)

 

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