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Abuja Indigenes Heads To Court, Demands For Governor, 3 Senators, Reps, State Assembly, After Tribunal Says FCT Has No Special Status

Just In : Abuja indigenes approach court, demand governor, 3 senators, Reps, state assembly, after tribunal says FCT has no special status over other states

Original inhabitants in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) have concluded plans to approach the court to seek an order mandating the Federal government of Nigeria and the National Assembly to let them produce their governor, three Senators, House of Representatives, and State House of Assembly members, respectively. According to a post made on his verified X account formerly known as Twitter, Daniel Bwala, former spokesman of Atiku Abubakar Presidential Campaign Organisation, said they made the demand following the Presidential Petition Tribunal Court’s judgment, which states that Abuja is just like any other state.

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He wrote: “Following the Presidential Election Petition Court’s judgment which states to the effect that Abuja is just like any other state; I am hearing that the natives of Abuja are approaching the court for an order mandating FGN to let them produce their Governor and 3 Senators amongst other peculiarities of a state. What is good for Guinea is also good for Uganda.lollllllllll” Following the Presidential Election Petition Court’s judgment which states to the effect that Abuja is just like any other state; I am hearing that the natives of Abuja are approaching the court for an order mandating FGN to let them produce their Governor and 3 Senators amongst… — D. H Bwala (@BwalaDaniel) September 10, 2023 Meanwhile, the Presidential Election Petitions Tribunal has ruled that the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) has no special status over other 36 states of the federation over the 25% required votes in the presidential election held on February 25. Advertisements The court, in its ruling on Wednesday, says the FCT is not superior to any state.

The tribunal said the Labour Party’s “interpretation of 134(2)(b) of the constitution is completely fallacious, if not outrightly ridiculous. ”Section 134 (1) and (2) of the 1999 Constitution of Nigeria (as amended) stipulates that a presidential candidate must attain or score a majority of votes cast in a presidential election, where two or more candidates are involved, and at least 25% in two-thirds of the 36 States and FCT to meet the constitutional requirement to be declared as duly elected as President of Nigeria.

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